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TimeValue Software Blog

Calculating Lease Payment Factors

By Martel Pellerin

A lease rate factor is the regular lease payment as a percent of the total cost of the leased equipment. Stated another way, if you multiply the lease rate factor by the cost of the leased equipment, you will determine the regular payment amount. The lease rate factor is a simplistic way of getting the payments but it is not that simple.

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Using Zero Payments for Accruals

By Martel Pellerin

Often, we have no activity on a loan or an investment but we want to know the amount of interest that is accruing or compounding. You can trigger the interest to appear by adding events such as a Payment or Invest for a $0 amount. This causes TValue to calculate the interest and, depending on the compute method, either add it to the principal if you are using Normal (compound interest) or to the accrued interest balance if you are using US Rule (simple interest).

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The Impact of Compounding

By Martel Pellerin

In reviewing the 2017 Berkshire Performance summary, you would be amazed at the impact that compounding has over a number of years. In their report, they show three return calculations: the Berkshire per share “book value” which was a 19.1% compounded annual return, the Berkshire per share “market value” which was a 20.9% compounded annual return, and the S&P 500 compounded annual return of 9.9%. These were from August 31, 1964 to December 31, 2017.

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Pasting Excel into TValue 6

By Martel Pellerin

How many times have you had a detailed schedule in Excel and wanted to copy it into TValue instead of inputting it line by line? With TValue 6, pasting lines from Excel into the cash flow matrix can be easy with this advanced feature.

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Understanding the IRS’ Failure to File Penalty

By Martel Pellerin

There are some penalties that are pretty straight forward and then there is the IRS Failure to File (FTF) penalty 6651(a)(1).  The FTF is a 5% per month penalty to a maximum of 5 months or 25% from the due date or the extension date, whichever is later. If the FTF and the Failure to Pay (FTP) penalty run simultaneously, you only pay 4.5% for the FTF penalty and it caps out at 22.5% as the IRS is limiting the combination of the two penalties to 5% overall.  That is the good news.

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